* Using Moving Here in community projects

General points


Sections:


Project ideas for Young People

Game 1: Mapping Our Journies

Equipment needed:
A copy of a world map for each person, OR a large map of the world.

Step 1:
Either procure a large map of the world and pin it on the wall, or give a small (A4) version to each person.

Note - Which projection?
There are several different versions of the map of the world, because mapmakers have taken different approaches to solving the basic problem of projection - i.e. how to make the round, 3-dimensional world fit onto a square, 2-dimensional map.

The different projections also reflect different social and political attitudes. For example, is North at the top? Is Europe in the centre? Does the map solve the 'projection' problem by making certain countries look larger than they really are - and if so, which ones?

You could use a projection that appeals to you, or you could even use a selection of different projections, and encourage the young people to discuss the differences.

You can see some of the different projections here: *www.btinternet.com/~se16/js/mapproj.htm

Go here to see the Moving Here world map.

Step 2:
If you're using small individual maps, each child should draw onto their map the migration journey that they and their family have made. For each generation further back that they know, use a different colour.
OR, if using a large map:
Each child in turn comes up to the front of the class and draws a line onto the map to join the place their family came from and the place they are living now.
Encourage children to look at an atlas or a globe to check the location of places.

Please note: If there are English and Welsh children in the group, note that the journeys their families may have taken, although shorter, are no less significant, and the map might need to show the UK in a larger scale to enable these journeys to be added. Most maps are big enough to show a journey from Scotland or Ireland.

Step 3:
Take a digital photograph of your finished map, or scan the individual maps, and add them to the site along with comments from members of the group. People could write their comments onto luggage labels or something else that symbolises travel.

See this story for an example of this type of project: Round Chapel Neighbourhood Project.

Game 2: Questions and Stories

Equipment needed:
Computers, one between 3, with Internet connections: or print-outs of a selection of stories from Moving Here website.

Step 1:
Go to www.movinghere.org.uk/stories/default.asp.

Show children the search box at the top right of the screen, and explain that typing a word into this box (for example ('Liverpool' or 'Bangladesh' or '1990') and clicking 'search' will allow them to find all stories which include the word they searched for. Encourage them to think of themes, places and dates to search for, and to read some of the stories that come up.

Alternatively, print out some of the following stories and encourage the group to read a few of them. (These are fairly short and simple stories, suitable for all age groups.)

Step 2:
Once the children have read some of the stories, ask them to form small groups of 4 or 5, and to discuss:

Ask the small groups to feed back what they thought.

Step 3
You could follow this up by asking the young people to write something about what they have read, or about their own experiences of migrating; or you could go on to Game 3 below.

Game 3 - An Interview

Equipment needed:
The Microsoft Word document, opens in a new windowinterviewing skills sheet
Computers with Internet connections

Step 1:
In small groups of 4 or 5, ask each group to think about what they would ask someone if they were interviewing them about their experience of migrating.

Ask each group to come up with five questions that they think would produce an interesting short interview. Do they think they would ask different questions depending on where their interviewee came from, and when?

Step 2:
Bring the groups back together, and look at each other's questions. Write them all up on a flip chart, and discuss the similarities and differences in the ideas.

Step 3
Finally, explain that each child is going to interview someone they know who has migrated to London.

Explain that this could be a friend, a family member, a neighbour, a teacher - anyone they know - and that the migration can be from anywhere in the world - it could be from far afield, or from a country nearby such as France or Wales. The migration might have been recent, or it might have been decades ago.

Ask each child to select five questions from the ones on the flip chart - it might be the original five devised by their own group, or they can take ideas from all the groups. They should write their chosen questions down.

Step 4:
Go through the 'interviewing skills' sheet with the class. If you like, you could practice on each other.

Step 5:
For homework, each child conducts their interview and writes down the answers, and gives their interviewee a Moving Here permission form to sign.

Step 6:
Bring the completed interviews and permission forms back to class.

Step 7:
Either:Using computers, go to www.movinghere.org.uk, and follow the 'Tell Us Your Story' link on the homepage. Each child can then type in their interview - see the 'general' instructions at the beginning.
Or: The teacher or someone else could type in the stories.

Game 4 - a photo of my school

Equipment needed:
A computer with Internet connection OR The Moving Here 'Schools' exhibition Digital or disposable cameras.

Step 1: (to be done by the group leader in advance)
Either: Contact Moving Here and borrow our exhibition of images about schools, teachers and pupils,
Or: Search the site for images about school, and print off some that you think your group will like.

Step 2:
Ask the group to look at the images and discuss them in small groups.

Step 3:
Ask the class (either individually or in small groups) to take photos either using a digital camera, or disposeable cameras, which show something of the different cultures to be found in the school. Ask them to think of aspects of their school life which people might find interesting in the future.

You might like to discuss ideas with the class first - how will they photograph the things they want to show? Encourage them to find interesting ways of photographing their ideas. Examples could include:

People will come up with plenty of their own ideas!

Step 4:
Post or email the best photos to Moving Here, together with the photographer's name, the date and place the photo was taken , and a note about what it shows.

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Project Ideas using Reminiscence
(These can be used with elders, or inter-generational groups.)

Game 1 - looking at pictures

Equipment needed:
A computer with an Internet connection
A printer

Step 1: (to be done by the group leader in advance)
Go to www.movinghere.org.uk/search/default.asp
Choose the 'advanced search' option.
Search for pictures relevant to your group. Use the 'advanced search' form to specify a keyword, dates, community, and/or theme. Also tick the box for 'pictures and photographs'.

You could look for images and maps of their countries of origin; images of the part of England where you all are now; or images related to a keyword that interests the group. You might have to try a few different keywords till you find exactly what you want (for example, try both 'demonstration' and 'protest'; or 'cooking' and 'food'; or 'music' and 'dance hall'). Print off any suitable images you find.

Step 2:
Divide the group up into pairs.
Give each pair a few of the images you selected.

Step 3:
Ask the pairs to discuss their images.

Step 4:
Ask each pair to report back to the rest of the group on the picture they found most interesting, and to say a little about it.

Step 5:
Once everyone has spoken, throw the discussion open to the floor!

Step 6:
You can run further sessions, setting a theme for the discussion each time. Popular themes are:

If one theme produces a particularly good discussion, you could focus on that for a few sessions. Ask people to bring in old photos and objects of interest that relate to the theme.

Step 7:
Run a basic IT session and show people how to add their stories to the site. (See our IT training manual for instructions on how to run a session.)

Game 2 - Significant Objects

Equipment needed:
Computers, one between 2 or 3, with Internet connections
A digital camera
A large piece of plain cloth to use as a backdrop

Step 1:

People choose all kinds of objects to talk about. If your group is stuck for ideas, encourage them to consider things like:

Note: You can use this game as a warm-up/introduction for other activities around migration, in which case it ends here.
Or, for a group that enjoys creative writing, you could ask people to write about their special object, describing how it looks and feels, and what it means to them.
Or, you could ask people to write down their chosen object(s) onto a small piece of paper or a luggage label; then collect the labels all together and find a way to display them all for people to read - a collage? Put them all in a small suitcase? Hang them on the wall?

Step 2:
If you have a digital camera, and access to some computers with Internet connections (ask your local library!), this game can be made into a photography project.

Step 3:
Download the pictures onto a computer. Title them so you know whose is whose!

Step 4:
Next session, go to www.movinghere.org.uk, and follow the 'Tell Us Your Story' link. Ask each person to type in a short piece about their object, explaining what it is, where it comes from, and why it's important to them. Illustrate the story with the photo.

Game 3 - Memories from Our Home

This is ideal for a group who are all from the same community. It is based on the project, 'Memories from the Islands', in which members of a Caribbean elders' group devised an exhibition around their favourite images of the Caribbean from the Moving Here website. Their comments, based on their personal knowledge of the things shown in the pictures, really enriches the viewers' understanding of the pictures.

You can view the project here: Memories from the Islands or you can borrow the Memories from the Islands exhibition from Moving Here

A similar project could be done by a South Asian, Irish or Jewish group, the communities which (so far!) are the most well-represented

on the Moving Here website. Either a group of elders, or an intergenerational group, could do this.

Equipment needed:
Computers with Internet connections
A printer

Step 1
Share a computer between 2 or 3 people.
Show people the 'search' facility. Use 'Advanced search', so you can search specifically for pictures and photos.
Ask people to search for pictures related to the place that the group comes from.
When anyone finds an image they like, ask them to print it off, and make a note of what it shows. You might also want to save a link to the image, so you can find it again easily.

Step 2
Collect all the printed pictures together.
Ask the group to look at them, and discuss them in a similar way to the 'Looking at Pictures' game above.
Ask people to comment on the images. Do they show things that they remember from home, or have heard about? What do they notice in the pictures? (Have a look at 'Memories from the Islands' on the Moving Here website to see the kinds of things people might mention.) This process might take several sessions.

Step 3
Gradually, begin weeding out the less-interesting images, and noting down some of the comments about the more interesting ones. You might find that a particular topic or theme begins to predominate, depending on the group's interests - perhaps images of food, or church, etc. If so, it's probably most effective if all your chosen images fit your theme, rather than having only one or two which don't fit. On the other hand, your group might select images of many different aspects of life in their country.

Step 4
Eventually, try to get to a stage where you have no more than 30 of the group's favourite images; and one or two comments, from different members of the group, for each image. Try to ensure that everyone has one of their comments or memories selected.
Write up the comments, which can be quite long and detailed.

Step 5
At this stage, you could go back to the Moving Here website; ask people to find the chosen images again, and add the comments to it. (To do this, find the image, click on the 'Add This Item To Your Story' link, and type in the comment.)
Or, if you're feeling ambitious, your group could look for funding to produce the images and comments as a physical exhibition, like 'Memories From The Islands'. Please contact Moving Here if you're thinking of doing this, and we may be able to advise you.

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Ideas for ESOL (English as a Second Language)

Moving Here is a good resource to use for ESOL sessions. You can use it to cover the four main language skills:

If you can get access to computers, people could type in their finished stories and add them to the site. (See the 'General' section at the beginning for details.)

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Ideas for Family Learning

Game 1 - Mapping Our Journies

The 'Mapping Our Journies' game, in the 'young people' section above, can be used effectively with families. Parents can tell children about their family history, and where members of their family came from; and children can draw it onto a map.

Game 2 - Creating an Exhibition

Equipment needed:
A computer for each family, with an Internet connection
A printer

Step 1

Step 2

Game 3 - Cultural Signs

Equipment needed:
a digital camera, or disposeable camera, for each family
a flip chart

Step 1
Ask the whole group to think about what cultures and communities live in their area. Ask people to call out ideas, and write them all up on a flip chart.

Step 2
Now ask the group to consider how you can tell that these communities live in the area. What are the little signs that show the different cultural backgrounds to be found? For example:

Some things may be obvious and big; others may be small, almost-hidden details.

Step 3
Ask each family to go out and about with their camera, and take photos which show indications of the different cultures living in the area.
They could choose to focus on one culture (either their own, or not), or they could try and cover as many of the different cultures as they can, depending on their preferences and the type of area you're working in.
When photographing small details, remind people to go up close. The subject of your picture should fill the frame. Try different angles and positions until you find the one that is most effective.

Step 4
Select the best images of each community that the group identified at the beginning. Post or email the photos to Moving Here, together with the photographer's name, the date and place the photo was taken, and (if you like), a short comment about what the photo shows.

Or, if you have time, you can help the group upload their work to the site as a 'story'.

Step 5
You could expand this activity by inviting someone from your local museum or archive, and asking them to bring any items they have which come from the different communities in your area; or ask them to talk about local history and how the area has been influenced by the arrival of different communities.

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